Lojic Technologies

Archive for the ‘business’ Category

The Art of Innovation

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Found this Guy Kawasaki video on Duff O’Melia’s blog and enjoyed it.

Written by Brian Adkins

November 12, 2009 at 4:15 pm

Posted in business, communication, video

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Daniel Weinreb re: Lisp use at ITA

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Some random notes:

  • 650 KLOC plus 150 KLOC of open source code
  • 100 people on the team, 70 programmers
  • SBCL for the QPX product
  • Clozure CL for the reservations product
  • Availability requirement: four 9’s => less than 53 minutes downtime per year
  • Latency agreement

    • 90% of requests w/in 300 ms
    • 5% of requests w/in 600 ms
    • 5% of requests w/in 1,200 ms
  • Java presentation layer, Common Lisp stateless business layer, Oracle data layer
  • Daniel is very positive about Clojure
  • Some links from the talk:

Written by Brian Adkins

August 29, 2009 at 1:31 pm

Posted in business, programming, technology, video

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Gospel Software, LLC

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Gospel Software LogoAlmost a year ago, I formed Gospel Software, LLC with two friends from my church. Our mission for the company is to develop web applications to help churches administratively.

It’s been a joy to work with Jordan and Scott over the last year and we’re now to the point of beginning to heavily promote our three web applications to churches. These are two men I can learn a lot from – both technically and spiritually. I would be hard pressed to find better business partners.

Gospel Software currently has three web applications.

Directory:

I just released a new version of the Gospel Software Directory a few minutes ago – there are some new screen shots to show some of the features. I had wanted a nice online photo directory for our church for quite a while. I finally wrote a simple bare bones version a few years ago and ended up using it all the time, so I thought there might be a market for the product.

Over the last year, I wrote a completely new version, and now each church member can edit their own information, upload new photos, etc., so the information is more current and the church administrative staff has less work to do. I still think one of the best features is simply being able to match the faces of people I’ve met with their names. It’s now available for churches to try out and purchase.

This new version is just the beginning. I have a long list of enhancements I’ll begin rolling out over the next few months.

GuestView:

Scott’s GuestView program is something I use regularly as I follow up with visitors to our church. It’s so handy and easy to use. I get an email when I need to call a visitor, then I can enter notes about our conversation, and if they’d like information from another leader in the church, I can notify the appropriate people.

SongBook:

I had thought about developing a program to manage worship songs back in the mid-eighties, but I was never motivated enough to do anything about it. When Jordan showed me his SongBook application, I was blown away – it did everything I had thought of and much more. And of course it was web based since the internet had been invented since I began thinking of a similar program 🙂

I’m excited about seeing what will be happening with Gospel Software, LLC this coming year.

We do have an affiliate program that rewards both the affiliate and any church they refer. Contact me for details if you’re interested.

The technical experiences we’ve had over the last year should provide for some interesting and informative blog posts in the future. When we came together to form the company, we had three products written in three different languages / frameworks. Integrating the three products together with a common infrastructure has been very educational 🙂

We now have a robust infrastructure that will support any future applications very well.

  • Server configuration, backup & light disaster recovery
  • Ecommerce – credit card processing, subscription management, invoicing, etc.
  • Auditing and event logging
  • Easy deployment of new releases
  • User management, authentication, authorization & accounting
  • And more…

As I mentioned, there are three languages / frameworks involved, but there is quite a bit of Ruby and Rails, and there will likely be more in the future. Each of the three languages / frameworks have their pros & cons, but I do feel that Ruby and Rails does very well in the evaluation.

The following are some things that I have been particularly pleased with:

  • My Macbook Pro with OSX and Emacs as a development environment
  • Ruby & Rails
  • nginx web server
  • mongrel application server
  • Postgres relational database
  • Trac issue tracker & wiki
  • Subversion source code control (possibly moving to git in the future, but for our purposes, svn has worked out very well)
  • Slicehost.com – being able to restart a VM on another server if hardware fails is awesome
  • Ubuntu Linux
  • istockphoto.com and fotolia.com for inexpensive stock photos
  • jQuery – it might not satisfy comp.lang.javascript, but it’s been great
  • Did I mention Emacs? 🙂

Written by Brian Adkins

February 11, 2009 at 2:50 am

Posted in business

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Startup School 2008

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http://omnisio.com/startupschool08

http://www.justin.tv/hackertv/97554/Startup_School

Peter Norvig, Paul Graham, Marc Andreessen, Mike Arrington, Jeff Bezos, David Heinemeier Hansson, etc.

Written by Brian Adkins

April 21, 2008 at 12:22 pm

Posted in business, people, video

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Paul Graham on Procastination

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The most impressive people I know are all terrible procrastinators. So could it be that procrastination isn’t always bad?

Most people who write about procrastination write about how to cure it. But this is, strictly speaking, impossible. There are an infinite number of things you could be doing. No matter what you work on, you’re not working on everything else. So the question is not how to avoid procrastination, but how to procrastinate well.

It’s ironic that I read this essay while procastinating 🙂 To read the rest, click the previous link.

Written by Brian Adkins

December 17, 2007 at 9:46 pm

Posted in business, people

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Lojic Technologies is Expanding

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Lojic Technologies is gearing up for new business projects. I finally got around to putting up a portfolio page with a few past projects.

http://www.lojic.com/portfolio/

We’re currently offering a 10% referral fee, so if you become aware of businesses or individuals in need of web sites or web applications, let me know. Once my referral advertising system is completed (in the next few weeks), we’ll integrate it with the corporate site to track referrals automatically.

Brian

Written by Brian Adkins

September 18, 2007 at 11:00 pm

Posted in business

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www.lojic.com facelift

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I created Lojic Technologies in 1998. Over the years I have occasionally worked full time at the company while consulting, and at other times I just kept it active to be available in the future. Since I’ve never needed to market myself, I simply threw a web site together as a placeholder.

Now that I’ve been full time with Lojic Technologies since October ’06 working on several web applications, I’m getting to the point of needing a better web presence, so last Saturday, with some help from my right brained wife, I gave the old site a face lift. It’s still small, and simple, but I think it looks a bit better now.

Besides the cosmetic changes, I also moved from a static site to Ruby on Rails and switched to XHTML 1.0 Strict.

Old Version

New Version www.lojic.com

I’ve also added a link in the sidebar now that the site isn’t an embarrassment. I’m quite pleased with how easy it was to get a Rails app running on Bluehost. I already host this wordpress blog there, so I thought it might be difficult adding a Rails app into the mix without clobbering each other, but it was quite simple (after spending hours researching it 🙂 )

The site is almost entirely static except for the contact form. I finally arrived at a nice way to host a (mostly) static site with Rails, but I’ll have to blog about that in a later entry.

Written by Brian Adkins

August 6, 2007 at 8:27 pm

Posted in business, communication, web design

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Adblock Plus

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Facebook.com just ran an ad that was quite offensive to me. I should’ve taken Scott Moonen’s advice from his blog earlier, but better late than never. He has simple instructions for installing Adblock on his blog. Check it out and get rid of ads!

Written by Brian Adkins

July 23, 2007 at 12:29 pm

Posted in business

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How to Succeed in 2007

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Business 2.0 has an article on How to Succeed in 2007 “We asked 50 of the brightest minds in business how they do what they do – and how you can cash in on their advice in the year ahead.”

Here are a few snippets. There seems to be an inverse correlation between the value of the advice and the age of the company.

Sergey Brin
Co-founder, Google

Simplicity is an important trend we are focused on. Technology has this way of becoming overly complex, but simplicity was one of the reasons that people gravitated to Google initially.

Richard Branson
Founder and Chairman, Virgin Group

That may well be pragmatically right, but I still think it’s morally wrong, and I suspect that anything that is morally wrong is ultimately bad for business.

Howard Schultz
Chairman, Starbucks

In the early years, we tried everything we could to exceed the expectations of our customers. But we knew that to achieve that goal we had to first exceed the expectations of our people.

Chad Hurley
Co-founder, YouTube

Listen to the community and adapt. We had a lot of our own ideas about how the service would evolve. Coming from PayPal and eBay, we saw YouTube as a powerful way to add video to auctions, but we didn’t see anyone using our product that way, so we didn’t add features to support it.

Kevin Rose
Founder, Digg

Letting users control your site can be terrifying at first. From day one we were asking ourselves, “What is going to be on the front page today?” You have no idea what the system will produce. But stepping back and giving consumers control is what brought more and more people to the site.

Reed Hastings
Co-founder and CEO, Netflix

Truly brilliant marketing happens when you take something most people think of as a weakness and reposition it so people think of it as a strength.

Helen Greiner
Co-founder and Chairman, iRobot

Venture capitalists like to invest in things that have succeeded before, but when we started iRobot, there weren’t any successes in this industry. We were turned down by every major VC across the country, but we just kept knocking on people’s doors until we found the visionary types who understood our passion and agreed there was a market in the making.

Stewart Butterfield
Co-founder, Flickr

One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned is that there has got to be a reason for what you’re doing. You actually have to care about what you’re doing. The business has to be about something.

Tim O’Reilly
Founder and CEO, O’Reilly Media

1. Be first. This is one of the immutable laws of marketing. Who was the first person to fly across the Atlantic? Lindbergh. Who was the second? No idea.

2. If you can’t be first, create a new category so you can be first. Who was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic? Amelia Earhart. New category. We didn’t have the first Web conference out there, but when we applied “Web 2.0” to the category, we created something new.

Written by Brian Adkins

April 12, 2007 at 10:32 pm

Posted in business

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