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Archive for the ‘video’ Category

BBC Richard Feynman Interview

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Although I disagree with Richard Feynman’s conclusions on some of the more important questions we can ask, no one can deny he is an interesting and amazing person. I’ve read a few biographical books about him, and they were quite entertaining. Here is a video interview he did for the BBC in 1981.

Although I’ve read a fair amount about him, this was the first time I heard his voice. I noticed he sounds very much like Regis Philbin 🙂

UPDATE:
Here are a few more BBC video links:

Written by Brian Adkins

November 16, 2007 at 11:21 am

Posted in people, video

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Ruby Hoedown 2007 Videos

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I noticed on Rick DeNatale’s blog that the videos for Ruby Hoedown 2007 are now available.

Written by Brian Adkins

August 20, 2007 at 1:12 pm

Posted in communication, video

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Animator vs. Animation

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Here’s an awesome animation by Alan Becker. The youtube version below is a little fuzzier than the original. A lot of work went into this. Thanks to Craig McDowell for passing this along.

Written by Brian Adkins

August 15, 2007 at 7:49 pm

Posted in entertainment, video

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How Bill Gates Beat Gary Kildall

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Robert Scoble has created three video interviews with Tom Rolander (and a few other folks) dealing with early PC industry history. Who is Tom Rolander? He’s the guy who was flying with Gary Kildall when IBM came calling. The end of the story is that Microsoft got the OS deal with IBM. The video series fills in some of the blanks 🙂 Aren’t familiar with this story? You should read: Hard Drive

A couple other good tech history books are:
Nerds 2.0.1 and
Dealers of Lightning

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Written by Brian Adkins

August 13, 2007 at 1:50 pm

Posted in books, technology, video

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Social Bookmarking

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Here’s a video that explains why using a site such as del.icio.us can be useful. I think they may have failed to mention that you can mark bookmarks as private on del.icio.us, so it’s not necessary to expose your bookmarks to the world. However, in my case, I only mark a small fraction as private.

I’ve been using del.icio.us for quite some time. After I had been using it for a while, I realized that it had been a long time since I bookmarked something in my browser because I had developed a habit of bookmarking in del.icio.us. Most browsers force you into placing a bookmark into a hierarchical, or directory, structure, but on del.icio.us you can assign as many “tags” as you like to a particular bookmark so you can search for things more easily. del.icio.us also allows you to export your bookmarks so you aren’t at the mercy of a proprietary service.

Another thing that is handy is to subscribe to the del.icio.us feeds of your friends to be automatically notified when they bookmark something that may be of interest.

Written by Brian Adkins

August 7, 2007 at 8:34 pm

Posted in internet, video

Tagged with , ,

Peter Seibel’s “Practical Common Lisp” Google Talk

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Here’s Peter Seibel’s “Practical Common Lisp” talk at Google (about an hour):

Google Video Link

Written by Brian Adkins

August 4, 2007 at 1:15 am

Posted in books, people, programming, video

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Spider Car

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Three months to design, six months to build, $15,000 in parts…

Written by Brian Adkins

June 19, 2007 at 8:21 am

Posted in amazing, science, video

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Douglas Crockford: Advanced JavaScript

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Ok, last of the Douglas Crockford videos. These are definitely worth viewing if you program at all in JavaScript. The highlight for me was his presentation of prototypal and parasitic inheritance models and contrasting them with the pseudo-classical approach that is typically presented. I haven’t had time to analyze his approach in depth, but from a single viewing, his ideas certainly merit experimentation and seem to fit in more naturally to the JavaScript language.

I felt he did a good job of presenting natural ways of handling encapsulation, inheritance and code reuse while capitalizing on JavaScript’s strengths instead of trying to impose a class-based design onto the language. He also covered several ways of utilizing closures nicely.

function object(0) {
  function F() {}
  F.prototype = o;
  return new F();
}
newobject = object(oldobject);

var singleton = function () {
  var privateVariable;
  function privateFunction(x) {
    ...privateVariable...
  }
  return {
    firstMethod: function (a,b) {
      ...
    },
    secondMethod: function (c) {
      ...
    }
  };
}();

Object.prototype.later = function(msec, method) {
  var that = this,
      args = Array.prototype.slice.apply(arguments, [2]);
  if (typeof method === 'string') {
    method = that[method];
  }
  setTimeout(function () {
    method.apply(that, args);
  }, msec);
  return that;
};

Advanced JavaScript Part 1 of 3
Advanced JavaScript Part 2 of 3
Advanced JavaScript Part 3 of 3

Written by Brian Adkins

May 17, 2007 at 10:38 pm

Posted in programming, video

Tagged with ,

Douglas Crockford: Theory of the DOM

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Here’s a set of 3 videos by Douglas Crockford on the DOM that were in between his JavaScript and Advanced JavaScript presentations. Pretty basic material, but you may find a few helpful hints. A few comments:

  1. Comment hack for JavaScript hasn’t been necessary for 10 years!
  2. language=javascript has been deprecated
  3. type=’text/javascript’ is ignored if you use the src attribute
  4. remove any event handlers of a node before deleting it due to MS garbage collection incompetencies
  5. avoid trickling, bubbling is where the action is

Theory of the DOM Part 1 of 3

Theory of the DOM Part 2 of 3

Theory of the DOM Part 3 of 3

Written by Brian Adkins

May 17, 2007 at 7:04 pm

Posted in programming, video, web design

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Douglas Crockford: JavaScript

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Thanks to Jordan Liggitt for passing on some videos on JavaScript by Douglas Crockford who is a senior JavaScript architect at Yahoo! The first series is pretty basic, but if you’re new to the language, it’s a very good introduction. Here are some random items I thought were noteworthy:

  • Brendan Eich at Netscape originally wanted to make a dialect of Scheme, but his manager said that people wouldn’t accept “all those parentheses”, and he should make something with a friendlier syntax. Too bad, I would love to able to program Scheme in the browser
  • Brendan did sneak in lambda though, he just didn’t call it that 🙂
  • No separate character type, just strings of length 1
  • == and != do type coercion; === and !== do not
  • bitwise operators convert to a 32 bit signed integer and then back to a 64 bit float, so don’t use them for efficiency like you might in C
  • don’t use the with statement
  • be careful with for (var name in object) due to iteration of inherited members also
  • blocks don’t have scope, only functions do
  • vars are implicitly global if not declared
  • 4 ways to call a function

    1. functionObject(args)
    2. thisObject.methodName(args)
      thisObject[“methodName”](args)
    3. new functionObject(args)
    4. functionObject.apply(thisObject[, args])
  • don’t use eval except for trusted JSON
  • http://www.JSLint.com a tool Crockford wrote
  • Semicolon insertion: when the compiler sees an error, it attempts to replace a nearby linefeed with a semicolon and try again! Always use the full correct form including semicolon. This was a surprise to me because once I discovered semicolons were optional, I stopped using them for a cleaner look. Oops.

The JavaScript Programming Language Part 1 of 4
The JavaScript Programming Language Part 2 of 4
The JavaScript Programming Language Part 3 of 4
The JavaScript Programming Language part 4 of 4

I’ll post another entry after I go through Crockford’s advanced series.

Written by Brian Adkins

May 17, 2007 at 3:26 pm

Posted in programming, video

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