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Posts Tagged ‘arc

Programming Language Popularity – Part Six

with 3 comments

I compiled some programming language popularity statistics in April 2009, October 2009, October 2010, September 2011 and August 2012 . Here’s an update for February 2013:

I made a number of Google searches of the forms below and summed the results:

"implemented in <language>"
  "written in <language>"

Naturally this is of very limited utility, and the numbers are only useful when comparing relatively within the same search since the number of results Google returns can vary greatly over time.

I’ve divided the table into sections based on large percentage drops from one language to the next.

|------+-----------------+------------+----------+-------+------------|
| Rank | Language        |    # Search| Previous |  Rank | Delta from |
|      |                 |     Results|     Rank | Delta |    Apr '09 |
|------+-----------------+------------+----------+-------+------------|
|    1 | PHP             |  52,699,000|        1 |       |          3 |
|    2 | C               |  39,330,000|        2 |       |         -1 |
|    3 | C++             |  26,490,000|        4 |     1 |            |
|    4 | Python          |  22,410,000|        3 |    -1 |          1 |
|    5 | C#              |  21,474,000|        5 |       |          2 |
|------+-----------------+------------+----------+-------+------------|
|    6 | Perl            |  11,013,000|        8 |     2 |            |
|    7 | Java            |  10,150,000|        6 |    -1 |         -5 |
|    8 | JavaScript      |   7,340,000|        9 |     1 |          1 |
|------+-----------------+------------+----------+-------+------------|
|    9 | Ruby            |   3,456,000|        7 |    -2 |          1 |
|   10 | Lisp Family (1) |   2,955,000|       10 |       |         -2 |
|   11 | FORTRAN         |   2,256,000|       11 |       |        N/A |
|   12 | Lisp            |   1,708,000|       17 |     5 |            |
|   13 | R               |   1,305,000|       21 |     8 |        N/A |
|   14 | Tcl             |   1,072,100|       13 |    -1 |         -1 |
|   15 | Lua             |   1,011,000|       19 |     4 |          5 |
|   16 | ML Family (2)   |     988,400|       16 |       |         -2 |
|   17 | Erlang          |     842,000|       18 |     1 |         -1 |
|   18 | COBOL           |     729,200|       23 |     5 |        N/A |
|   19 | Haskell         |     707,000|       12 |    -7 |         -4 |
|   20 | Common Lisp     |     557,000|       20 |       |         -2 |
|   21 | OCaml           |     528,000|       24 |     3 |         -4 |
|   22 | Prolog          |     521,000|       25 |     3 |         -3 |
|   23 | (S)ML (3)       |     496,800|       27 |     4 |          1 |
|   24 | Scala           |     426,100|       22 |    -2 |          1 |
|   25 | Scheme          |     347,000|       28 |     3 |        -14 |
|   26 | Groovy          |     320,000|       14 |   -12 |        N/A |
|------+-----------------+------------+----------+-------+------------|
|   27 | Smalltalk       |     201,400|       29 |     2 |         -6 |
|   28 | Go              |     201,200|       15 |   -13 |        N/A |
|   29 | CoffeeScript    |     182,800|       31 |     2 |        N/A |
|   30 | Clojure         |     173,100|       30 |       |         -2 |
|   31 | Forth           |     128,800|       26 |    -5 |         -8 |
|   32 | Caml            |     102,600|       34 |     2 |         -6 |
|   33 | Racket          |      93,500|       33 |       |        N/A |
|   34 | Arc             |      76,400|       32 |    -2 |        -12 |
|   35 | Io              |      60,200|       35 |       |         -8 |
|------+-----------------+------------+----------+-------+------------|

(1) combines Lisp, Scheme, Common Lisp, Racket, Arc & Clojure
(2) combines OCaml, (S)ML, Caml
(3) summed separate searches for standard ml, sml & ml

Written by Brian Adkins

February 23, 2013 at 2:59 pm

Programming Language Popularity – Part Four

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See Part Five

I compiled some programming language popularity statistics in April 2009, October 2009 and October 2010 . Here’s an update for September 2011:

I made a number of Google searches of the forms below and summed the results (previous posts averaged the results):

"implemented in <language>"
  "written in <language>"

Naturally this is of very limited utility, and the numbers are only useful when comparing relatively within the same search since the number of results Google returns can vary greatly over time.

Language Total Prev. Position Position Delta
C 10,360,000 2 1
PHP 10,351,000 1 -1
C++ 6,495,000 3 0
Python 5,759,000 5 1
C# 5,335,000 4 -1
 
Java 4,890,000 8 2
Perl 3,702,000 6 -1
JavaScript 3,077,000 7 -1
Ruby 1,654,000 9 0
Lisp Family1 1,022,870 11 1
 
FORTRAN 975,600 10 -1
Tcl 594,500 12 0
Lisp 486,000 14 1
Haskell 450,500 16 2
Erlang 419,700 13 -2
 
Lua 367,100 18 2
ML Family2 348,400 17 0
COBOL 308,270 15 -3
Common Lisp 254,900 19 0
OCaml 240,300 21 1
 
Prolog 224,000 20 -1
Scala 203,400 23 1
Scheme 184,700 22 -1
Smalltalk 129,700 24 0
Clojure 84,600 27 2
 
(S)ML3 83,630 25 -1
Forth 69,980 26 -1
Caml 24,470 28 0
Io 17,700 30 1
Arc 12,670 29 -1

1 combines Lisp, Scheme, Common Lisp, Arc & Clojure
2 combines OCaml, (S)ML, Caml
3 summed separate searches for sml and ml

Written by Brian Adkins

September 22, 2011 at 10:37 am

Programming Language Popularity – Part Three

with one comment

See Part Five

I compiled some programming language popularity statistics in April 2009 and October 2009 . Here’s an update for October 2010:

I made a number of Google searches of the forms below and averaged the results:

"implemented in <language>"
  "written in <language>"

Naturally this is of very limited utility, and the numbers are only useful when comparing relatively within one column since the number of results Google returns can vary greatly over time.

Language Apr 2009 Oct 2009 Oct 2010 Position Delta
PHP 680,000 5,083,500 14,096,000 +3
C 1,905,500 16,975,000 9,675,000 -1
C++ 699,000 6,270,000 6,510,000 -1
C# 349,700 2,125,000 5,132,000 +4
Python 396,000 3,407,000 5,114,500 +1
Perl 365,500 3,132,500 4,675,000 +1
JavaScript 102,700 1,163,000 2,120,000 +4
Java 850,000 5,118,000 1,495,500 -5
Ruby 99,650 227,000 1,426,000 +13
FORTRAN 1,621,000 770,850 0
Lisp Family1 176,507 3,489,650 399,685 -6
Tcl 44,800 382,000 313,400 +5
Erlang 22,285 161,700 188,800 +12
Lisp 61,900 486,500 174,050 +1
COBOL 247,300 166,435 +6
Haskell 22,550 280,500 157,150 +4
ML Family2 29,062 1,003,800 149,005 -5
Lua 13,065 131,800 128,150 +9
Common Lisp 20,600 554,500 112,750 -5
Prolog 17,750 390,500 100,000 -4
OCaml 22,000 343,500 99,050 -3
Scheme 86,450 2,100,000 82,650 -13
Scala 3,570 66,250 65,950 +6
Smalltalk 9,105 187,500 56,950 0
(S)ML3 5,173 590,700 42,130 -12
Forth 6,465 146,450 25,880 0
Clojure 782 62,200 23,525 +3
Caml 1,889 69,600 7,825 0
Arc 6,775 286,500 6,710 -10
Io 1,760 198,500 3,025 -7

1 combines Lisp, Scheme, Common Lisp, Arc & Clojure
2 combines OCaml, (S)ML, Caml
3 summed separate searches for sml and ml

Written by Brian Adkins

October 8, 2010 at 3:30 pm

Programming Language Popularity – Part Two

with one comment

See Part Five

I compiled some programming language popularity statistics in April and mentioned I’d update the results in 6 months, so here they are:

I made a number of Google searches of the forms below and averaged the results:

"implemented in <language>"
"written in <language>"

Language # Results
Apr 09
# Results
Oct 09
Position
Delta
C 1,905,500 16,975,000 0
C++ 699,000 6,270,000 +1
Java 850,000 5,118,000 -1
PHP 680,000 5,083,500 0
Lisp Family1 176,507 3,489,650 +3
Python 396,000 3,407,000 -1
Perl 365,500 3,132,500 -1
C# 349,700 2,125,000 -1
Scheme 86,450 2,100,000 +2
FORTRAN 1,621,000 N/A
JavaScript 102,700 1,163,000 -1
ML Family2 29,062 1,003,800 +3
(S)ML3 5,173 590,700 +12
Common Lisp 20,600 554,500 +5
Lisp 61,900 486,500 -2
Prolog 17,750 390,500 +4
Tcl 44,800 382,000 -3
OCaml 22,000 343,500 0
Arc 6,775 286,500 +4
Haskell 22,550 280,500 -4
COBOL 247,300 N/A
Ruby 99,650 227,000 -10
Io 1,760 198,500 +6
Smalltalk 9,105 187,500 -1
Erlang 22,285 161,700 -7
Forth 6,465 146,450 -1
Lua 13,065 131,800 -5
Caml 1,889 69,600 0
Scala 3,570 66,250 -2
Clojure 782 62,200 0

1 combines Lisp, Scheme, Common Lisp, Arc & Clojure
2 combines OCaml, (S)ML, Caml
3 summed separate searches for sml and ml

Written by Brian Adkins

October 24, 2009 at 10:23 am

Programming Language Popularity

with 12 comments

See Part Five

Despite the numerous ways in existence to quantify programming language popularity, I thought I’d throw yet another one into the mix. I made a number of Google searches of the forms below and averaged the results:

"implemented in <language>"
"written in <language>"

I’m very curious to see how these stats change over time, so I’ve added a calendar item to recompute them in six months. Leave a comment if you’d like to add a programming language to the list, and I’ll update this article and it will be included in the recomputation six months from now.

Language # Results
C 1,905,500
Java 850,000
C++ 699,000
PHP 680,000
Python 396,000
Perl 365,500
C# 349,700
Lisp Family1 176,507
JavaScript 102,700
Ruby 99,650
Scheme 86,450
Lisp 61,900
Tcl 44,800
ML Family2 29,062
Haskell 22,550
Erlang 22,285
OCaml 22,000
Common Lisp 20,600
Prolog 17,750
Lua 13,065
Smalltalk 9,105
Arc 6,775
Forth 6,465
(S)ML3 5,173
Scala 3,570
Caml 1,889
Io 1,760
Clojure 782

1 combines Lisp, Scheme, Common Lisp, Arc & Clojure
2 combines OCaml, (S)ML, Caml
3 summed separate searches for sml and ml
Update 4/23/09 added C#, Tcl per comment requests.

Written by Brian Adkins

April 21, 2009 at 2:55 pm

Blog Bifurcation Completed

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I’ve split my blog into two separate blogs. This blog has been repurposed with a more narrow technical / professional focus which will hopefully provide more value for my clients, customers & other software developers.

I’ll be posting other articles (personal, humorous, etc.) to my family blog.

In the process, I’ve become more familiar with nginx, SliceHost.com & WordPress and will likely be sharing about that later.

Astute readers may have noticed that my original plan to create the family blog using some whiz-bang technology was abandoned in favor of good ‘ol WordPress. Hopefully this is only temporary. I’ve been learning Haskell and looking into Clojure, Arc & Qi, so I’d like to be able to demonstrate some cool bleeding edge stuff in the near future.

Regardless of that, I have to say that Haskell is one of the coolest programming languages I’ve encountered. I highly recommend Programming in Haskell. It makes learning Haskell a joy.

Written by Brian Adkins

November 29, 2008 at 4:28 am

Posted in communication

Tagged with , ,

Blog Bifurcation

with 8 comments

One of the reasons I haven’t been blogging much lately is because I’ve decided to bifurcate my blog into a professional/technical blog (which will continue here on lojic.com/blog) and a personal blog, and until I’ve decided on the technology to use for my personal blog I’ve been reluctant to blog much.

The motivation for the split is the feeling that a lot of my non-technical family & friends grow weary of weeding through a lot of techno-geek material to find anything interesting, and folks who read my blog for technical info probably don’t want to weed through the silly videos, etc.

WordPress has worked fine for my blog thus far, but I want to take the opportunity to develop my personal blog in a new technology more for the learning experience than necessity. I haven’t had time to select the appropriate technology, so I have a bit of analysis paralysis.

The candidates are:

  • Ruby on Rails: I currently develop primarily in Ruby on Rails, so in that respect it would be the logical choice and easiest way to get started; however, it wouldn’t have the benefit of learning a new technology.
  • Arc: I had high hopes for Arc when Paul Graham first released it. I still think it has potential, but that potential is limited by Paul’s interest level and available time. It’s been over 3 months since the last release and that was only a small incremental improvement. The forum seems dead, and the fact that Arc went through a 5 year blackout period makes me wonder whether it will be a dead-end language and a waste of valuable time.
  • Common Lisp: I am leaning toward a Lisp, so if Arc doesn’t pan out, Common Lisp would be a good fallback language. It’s much more mature with robust implementations. It doesn’t provide a nice batteries included experience though, and I’ve been reluctant to collect the necessary libraries from various sources to allow anything remotely similar to Ruby on Rails with respect to ease of development. I think it may have a greater long term potential though, so it may be worth the effort.
  • Scheme: The PLT web server may give me a head start on a Lisp based web site, and Arc is based on MZScheme, so it’s on the short list.
  • Haskell: I know very little Haskell (even less than Lisp which is not much), but I’m intrigued by many aspects of the language. GHC seems to be a great compiler that produces well performing programs. My initial impression is that it will take more effort to learn than a Lisp, but in terms of brain stretching, it has a lot to offer. There is a Haskell based web server available, but like a lot of fringe languages, it appears to be pretty rough around the edges.

I have a vacation coming up, so I think I’ll use some of the down time to do some research and make a decision. Look for the blog bifurcation to happen in the latter half of June. If you have any opinions on the matter, please add a comment 🙂

Written by Brian Adkins

May 31, 2008 at 3:49 pm

Posted in communication

Tagged with , , ,

Arc has been released

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This has been a long time in coming. Paul Graham and Robert Morris have released an initial version of the Arc programming language.

Announcement
Language Web Site
Software
Tutorial
Forum

They recommend using version 352 of MzScheme because the latest version apparently breaks Arc. I already had 360 installed and was in a hurry, so I tried it, and most of the tutorial seemed to work fine except for the web server which failed. I’ll try later with 352 and see how it goes.

The language is still quite volatile, so I’m not sure if anyone is too interested in investing a lot of time creating libraries yet, but when the language settles down, I’m very curious about the acceptance level of Arc.

It seems to have quite a bit of Lispy goodness, and I’ve agreed with Paul’s language philosophy from what I’ve read about what he wants Arc to become. Hopefully it will live up to those ideas. On the one hand, I can see benefits in having a standard such as the one for Common Lisp, but on the other hand, Ruby & Python have done extremely well with the BDFL model with Matz & Guido, and I think Paul Graham could pull off that role if he wants to.

A problem with a “standards” approach is the proliferation of implementations dividing the community; whereas, the single implementation languages seem to have a more unified community.

If Arc can retain the best of Lisp, add some niceties from other languages and attract an active developer community, I think it may become very interesting.

rlwrap

Probably one of the best things I’ve gotten out of the Arc release so far was a tip from a guy on the forum on how to add readline support to the Arc REPL using rlwrap. I’d never heard of rlwrap before, and it’s awesome! I can now get readline support for logo and arc without needing to rebuild them with native support.

sudo apt-get install rlwrap
rlwrap logo

What a great idea 🙂

Written by Brian Adkins

January 29, 2008 at 9:14 pm

Posted in programming

Tagged with , ,